Fire-induced water-repellent soils an annotated bibliography

Cover of: Fire-induced water-repellent soils |

Published by U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, CO .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Water repellents -- Bibliography,
  • Soils -- Environmental aspects -- Bibliography,
  • Fire ecology -- Bibliography

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesFire induced water repellent soils.
Statementby Mary A. Kalendovsky and Susan H. Cannon.
GenreBibliography.
SeriesOpen-file report -- 97-720., U.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 97-720.
ContributionsCannon, Susan H., Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17596300M
OCLC/WorldCa43082171

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Sandy soils also had deeper water-repellent layers than fine loams or loams. This study found that in all cases (even in burned areas), water repellency began at the mineral surface. This is in contrast to other studies that have described the occurrence of post-fire water-repellent layers 1 or 2 inches below the surface (beneath a wettable layer).File Size: KB.

ABSTRACT. The development and nature of water-repellent, or hydrophobic, soils are important issues in evaluating hillslope response to fire. The following annotated bibliography was compiled to consolidate existing published research on the topic.

Water repellency (WR) from fire‐affected soils can affect infiltration processes and increase runoff rates.

We investigated the effects of fire‐induced changes in soil WR and the related soil hydrological response after one of the largest wildfires in Spain in recent by: Fire-induced water repellency in forest soils of upper Michigan.

Abstract. Soils on 53 burned sites in the upper peninsula of Michigan were examined for fire-induced water repellency. The development of water repellency was found to be fire related with over 40% of the burned soils showing at least some water-repellent by:   High surface temperatures ‘burn’ off organic materials and create vapours that move downward in response to a temperature gradient and then condense on soil particles causing them to become water repellent.

Water‐repellent soils have a positive water entry pressure h p Cited by: The spatial pattern of fire-induced soil water repellency was found to be associated to vegetation types, although it was modulated by soil acidity and the soil organic carbon content.

Soil water repellency was generally higher at the soil surface, and decreased with by: Post-fire land degradation is often attributed to fire-induced soil water repellency, despite the fact that soil water repellency is a natural phenomenon in many soils and is therefore not.

The fire-induced SWR weakened with time and disappeared one year after burning. The soil moisture thresholds above which water repellent soils became hydrophilic were approximately g g −1 of unburnt sites, g g −1 for sites burnt under low severity and g g −1 for sites burnt at moderate and high by: 2.

The consequence is very high runoff, which also contributes to high erosion on fire-induced water-repellent soils during rain storms. Grass establishment is impaired by seeds being eroded and lack of soil water for seeds that do remain and germinate.

water repellent soils, kinds of water repellent substances, effects of soil-water repellency on water movement, fire-induced soil-water repellency, man-agement problems and implications of water repellency, and future research needs. NATURE AND FORMATION OF WATER REPELLENT SOILS Normally, dry soils readily imbibe water.

A strongCited by: The distribution and variation with soil depth of water repellency has been studied in fire-affected sand dunes under three different vegetation types (pine forest, shrubland and sparse herbaceous vegetation) in SW Spain.

The persistence and intensity of water repellency at the exposed surface of soil was measured using the water drop penetration time test and the contact angle method, Cited by: A study of soil water repellency after Fire-induced soil water repellency is a key control on post-fire five different fires in the Colorado Front Range found runoff and erosion rates, but there are few data on the persistence that burn severity, percentage of sand, and soil moisture.

Applied Soil Ecology Estimating the extent of fire induced soil water repellency in Mediterranean environment Geoderma Can terra rossa become water repellent by burning. A laboratory approach Geoderma Effects of heating and post-heating equilibration times on soil water repellency Soil Research Soil water repellency often leads to severe runoff and erosion, rapid leaching of surface-applied agrichemicals, and losses of water and nutrient availability for crops.

At present, no optimum management strategies exist for water repellent soils, focusing on minimizing environmental risks while maintaining crop : Hardcover.

Soil Science Society of America Journal. Vol Issue 4. Mechanism of Fire‐Induced Water Repellency in Soil thereby broadening the water‐repellent layer. The temperature required for the “fixing” and the revolatilization appears to be greater than C. Water repellency (WR) from fire-affected soils can affect infiltration processes and increase runoff rates.

We investigated the effects of fire-induced changes in soil WR and the related soil hydrological response after one of the largest wildfires in Spain in recent years. The vertical distribution of WR in soil profiles was studied under oak and pine forests and the wetting. velocity. The results are explained by the effect of water repellent compounds on soil-water contact angle and on the strength of interparticle wet-bonding forces.

Citation: Ravi, S., P. D’Odorico, B. Herbert, T. Zobeck, and T. Over (), Enhancement of wind erosion Cited by: Soil Water Repellency Dr Rachel Poulter. Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Redlands Research Station, Cleveland, Q’ld. What is it. A water-repellent soil (or hydrophobic soil) does not wet up spontaneously when a drop of water is placed upon.

Fire‐induced soil water repellency is a key control on post‐fire runoff and erosion rates, but there are few data on the persistence of soil water repellency and the soil moisture threshold at which water repellent soils become hydrophilic.

Get this from a library. Fire-induced water-repellent soils: an annotated bibliography. [Mary A Kalendovsky; Susan H Cannon; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Our results experimentally support the hypothesis that fire induced water repellency in arid soils significantly affect the soil susceptibility to wind erosion.

This study has shown that the % and % treatments with HAD were able to induce significant water repellency in by: HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSNING OF FIRE INDUCED WATER REPELLENT SOILS Abstract By Sarah Ann Lewis, M.S.

Washington State University December Chair: Joan Wu The summer of was one of the worst fire seasons in history, especially for the state of Colorado where the Hayman Fire burned nea ha.

Almost a third of the. Soils on 53 burned sites in the upper peninsula of Michigan were examined for fire-induced water repellency. The development of water repellency was found to be fire related with over 40% of the burned soils showing at least some water-repellent properties.

Infiltration rate and soil wetting increase as the value of ho/hp increases. The consequence is very high runoff, which also contributes to high erosion on fire-induced water-repellent soils during rain storms. Grass establishment is impaired by seeds being eroded and lack of soil.

Water repellent soils exhibit hydrophobic properties when dry, resisting or retarding water infiltration into the soil matrix (Brandt, a). Infiltration rates may be reduced by an order of magnitude, even in soils which visually appear to wet “normally” (Wallis et al., ).Cited by: Most studies on fire-induced soil hydrophobicity in the USA have been done in chaparral (e.g.

DeBano and Krammes, ), and a few studies have documented the formation of a water-repellent layer in Pinus radiata (radiata pine), Pinus ponderosa ; (ponderosa pine). The goal of this review was to investigate the correlation of wildfires with decreased infiltration and increased runoff.

Research suggested that wildfires can alter several forest soil properties affecting infiltration and runoff, including the formation of a fire-induced water repellent layer, the addition of a surface ash layer, and the removal of surface cover.

The combination of these Author: Marissa Hallaway. Soil Research Soil water repellency: A molecular-level perspective of a global environmental phenomenon Geoderma Changes in soil organic compound composition associated with heat-induced increases in soil water repellency European Journal of Soil Science There are some classes of soils with limited affinity for soil water.

Soils are classified as wettable with contact angles φ soils are characterized by contact angles of φ ≥ 90°. The occurrence of water-repellent soils is rare and usually their repellency is temporary (dry soils).Author: Viliam Novák, Hana Hlaváčiková.

Fire-Induced Water Repellency A hypothesis describing how a water-repellent layer is formed beneath the soil surface during a fire has been developed (DeBano et al., ).Cited by: 8. repellency inducing fatty acid found in most plants.

The results indicate that fire-induced water repellency enhances soil erodibility, causing a drop in wind erosion threshold velocity. The results are explained by the effect of water repellent compounds on soil-water contact angle and on the strength of interparticle wet-bonding forces.

Fire induced water repellency can affect the soil and the watershed in the following ways: Hydrophobic soils repel water, reducing the amount of water infiltrating the soil.

Decreased soil infiltration results in increased overland and stream flow. The results indicate that fire-induced water repellency enhances soil erodibility, causing a drop in wind erosion threshold velocity. The results are explained by the effect of water repellent compounds on soil-water contact angle and on the strength of interparticle wet-bonding forces.

The fourth section is devoted to the effect of fire on water repellency, section five deals with the physics and modeling of flow and transport in water repellent soils, section six presents amelioration techniques and farming strategies to combat soil water repellency, and section seven concludes the book with an extensive bibliography on soil Book Edition: 1.

Fire-Induced Water-Repellent Soil Layers in Non-Hydromulched Areas of Griffith Park, Los Angeles, California Kunugi, D.1,2 & Satoh, A.1* 1 Institute of the Environment, University of California, Los Angeles, La Kretz Hall, SuiteBoxLos Angeles, CAUSA.

fire-induced soil water repellency. This study also develops a method to extract spectral signatures of burn severity classes and water repellent soils from high spectral resolution imagery to classify and map these parameters in a rangeland wildfire setting at a landscape scale. The use of hyperspectral imagery.

Soil properties may determine the occurrence and intensity of this property in burned soils. The objectives of this paper are to make advances in the study of soil properties as key factors controlling the behaviour of fire-induced WR, and to study the impact of pre-fire SOM content and SOM quality in fire-induced soil WR.

Field evaluation and hyperspectral imagery analysis of fire-induced water repellent soils and burn severity in Southern Idaho rangelands Thesis Abstract This study utilizes spectroscopy and field analysis to classify and detect burn severity and fire-induced soil water repellency following a.

works Search for books with subject Fire ecology. Search. Fire-induced water-repellent soils Mary A. Kalendovsky Not In Library.

Fire-induced water-repellent soils Mary A Kalendovsky Not In Library. Effect of ecosystem disturbance on diversity of bark and wood-boring b.

Fire-induced water repellency in soils has been a continuous concern of watershed managers since its identification in the early s. The formation of water repellent soil, its chemical nature, and its effect on infiltration, runoff and erosion have all captured the attention of. soil, which also contributes to post-fire decreases in water infiltration rates.

Soil water repellency, whether naturally occurring or fire-induced, is not a stable phenomenon. When the soil is wet after snow melt, hydrologic behavior is normal; however, when the soil dries, water repellent conditions reoccur (Dekker and Ritsema ).Soil properties may determine the occurrence and intensity of this property in burned soils.

The objectives of this paper are to make advances in the study of soil properties as key factors controlling the behaviour of fire-induced WR, and to study the impact of pre-fire SOM content and SOM quality in fire-induced soil by: Recommended Citation.

Reeder, C.J. and Jurgensen, M.F., "Fire-induced water repellency in forest soils of upper Michigan" (). Aspen by:

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